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Health Reward Stat of the Day – July 10

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Loyalogy, leading provider of loyalty program analysis, data mining, reporting and consulting services to the restaurant industry, announced the results of its second annual U.S. study tracking consumer attitudes and behavior regarding restaurant rewards programs. The study, based on detailed survey responses to 55 questions among 1,100 consumers from across the U.S., found that:

  • Consumers estimate an appealing restaurant rewards programs would increase their visit rate to a particular restaurant by an average of 35%.  This figure is consistent with the 2013 study.
  • Nearly three-fourths of consumers (73%) report they would recommend a restaurant more to others if that restaurant offered an appealing rewards program.  This figure is up from 65% in the 2013 study.
  • 86% of consumers prefer a rewards program with a clearly-defined proposition in which they earn rewards based on spending or visits rather than a program built solely on periodic, surprise free items.
    • 43% prefer a program that offers points which convert to rewards which may be spent like cash at the restaurant.
    • 43% prefer a program that is based upon visits, such as 8 visits spending a minimum amount each visit would generate a free meal.
    • 14% prefer a program that offers surprise free menu items that may be used for a certain period of time with no pre-defined criteria for receiving that free item.
    • Consumers desire a simple reward program enrollment process in the restaurant and would prefer to supply additional information online after they have left the restaurant.
    • Although consumer wallets are bulging with plastic cards, 60% of respondents stated that they don’t mind carrying a membership card for a rewards program if it’s necessary.
    • A single rewards program membership covering multiple restaurant brands has significant appeal to consumers.  75% of respondents agreed they would like to have one rewards program membership that was honored at multiple restaurant chains.  This figure is up from 73% in the 2013 study.
    • Consumers participate in an average of 3 restaurant rewards programs, up 15% from the 2013 study which found participation at an average of 2.6 restaurant rewards programs.
    • Consumers are visiting restaurants more frequently with an average of 13 times per month, up 26% from the 2013 study which found an average of 10.3 visits per month.
    • The 25 to 34 year-old age segment, which includes the oldest members of the Millennial Generation, demonstrates a more intense use of restaurants and rewards programs.  In our study we refer to this group as Millennials with Means because they fall into the Millennial age range and have a household income of $75,000 or more.
      • Millennials with Means visit restaurants 40% more (18.5 visits per month versus 13 visits per month for the overall population).
      • Millennials with Means participate in more than twice as many restaurant rewards programs (6.5 restaurant rewards programs versus 3 restaurant rewards programs for the overall population).
      • Millennials with Means are more responsive to rewards programs.  They estimate that an appealing restaurant rewards program will yield a visit increase of 43% versus 35% for the overall population.
      • Millennials with Means are much more interested in managing all aspects of their rewards program participation with a smart phone app.  A total of 57% of this group expressed a desire to do everything using a smart phone app versus 35% for the overall population.

ABOUT THE LOYALOGY CONSUMER RESEARCH STUDY

The Loyalogy consumer research study was conducted through an online survey of U.S. consumers between the ages of 25 and 65 with household incomes of $75,000 or more.  The respondents were selected from an online research panel provided by The Sample Network.  The survey consisted of 55 questions in categories that include:

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